Courses

The free access to course content will end after June 30, 2021, with the exception of EdReady Math and EdReady English, which ends after July 31, 2020.

This Advanced Programming: Game Design and Mobile Apps course is a highly project based course designed for high school students with some programming background before attempting this advanced level course. Students taking this course will learn to strategize, design, and develop games, as well as, mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course also exposes students to privacy, legality, and security considerations with regards to the software industry.

This course is the first in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. In the course, students will learn about algebraic concepts such as integers, linear equations, inequalities and factoring. As students work through each interactive lesson, they will have the opportunity to complete several self-check activities and journal entries. Ultimately, this course will assist students in developing fundamental algebraic skills that will allow them to use problem-solving strategies in real-world situations as well as using graphing technology to interpret, represent and communicate mathematical concepts.

This course is the first semester of a full year of Algebra 2. This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2A is the first semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover functions and polynomials, equations and inequalities, factoring and quadratics, conic sections, and radical and complex numbers.

This CCSS-aligned course further develops students’ understanding of algebraic functions and their applications. A major theme is the generalization of concepts and techniques from Algebra 1 and Geometry. Polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions are studied, and basic properties of complex numbers are introduced. Algebra 2B is the second semester in a two-semester course. In this semester, students will cover dividing and solving polynomials, rational expressions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Two major themes for this course are “Leadership at Home” and “Leadership in Society.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an informative essay and a major research project. Students partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, dialect, author’s purpose, foreshadowing, persuasive devices, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence and has been redesigned to align to the Common Core Standards. Two major themes for this semester are “Becoming My Own Leader” and “Leading Others.” Students will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works by American authors. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include an argument essay, a narrative essay, and a business email. As a supplement to these assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information, take Cornell notes for an informational text or during a lecture, and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, symbolism, point of view, and more.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence and focuses on everyday communication in American Sign Language for the Deaf. It introduces students to the basic signs, techniques, and cultural knowledge, which will support the students to start signing beginning level conversational ASL. Each lesson is built upon a familiar topic such as family, self and friends so that students will find meaningful connection to the lessons. Students will be asked to use various media tools including online resources, online dictionaries, a web cam, and the web based audio-visual tool VoiceThread to master the content presented in the course. Students will be producing their own signing videos to demonstrate their learning. The goal of this course is to help develop fundamental ASL skills, and to understand Deafness, knowledge, and interest that students will need to advance to the higher levels of ASL courses.

This course is the second in a two-course sequence. Topics addressed in the course include information about the Deaf culture, communication problems associated with deaf individuals, and the linguistic heritage of the Deaf community and its influence on our own culture. The online text includes many videos that include role-playing conversations as well as vocabulary. There will be live sessions using a web cam during which time students will demonstrate a mastery of general sign vocabulary along with producing their own conversations.

This is the first course of the second year ASL courses and must be taken after the successful completion of the first year ASL courses. This course continues to focus on everyday communication in ASL by introducing students to the basic signs, techniques and culture. To help develop receptive skills without relying on lip movements of the signers, the signing videos will be all “voice off.” To develop expressive skills, students will continue to express their thoughts in signs within the given context in the lessons. Through the introduction to some of the higher ASL techniques such as classifiers and indexing, this second year courses is designed to helps students to develop an understanding that ASL is a visual language that delivers one’s ideas and thoughts using more than the individual signs. Students will continue to use various media tools including online resources, online dictionaries, a web cam and the web based audio-visual tool VoiceThread to master the content presented in the course.

This is the second course of the second year of ASL courses. The course continues to focus on useful communication that students should be able to carry out in ASL. Students study the basic signs and phrases, techniques, and cultural nature of the language. This course introduces the students to the new concept of conceptually accurate signing that places emphasis on awareness of differences between ASL and English. Lesson topics shift from the everyday interaction in one’s immediate environment to interactions in the community to help students to build signing skills for obtaining and providing information rather than simply exchanging information. To support students build the conceptual accuracy, the lessons stress ASL classifiers; students will be challenged to receptively identify some of the most common classifiers in contexts, and to apply them in their own signing. As a part of culture learning, students will continue to learn more facts about the Deaf culture as well as current and past challenging social issues. The signing videos will be all “voice off” to help develop students’ receptive skills without reading lips. Students will continue to produce their own signing videos to demonstrate their learning. The goal of this course is to help utilize the fundamental ASL skills and knowledge into simple interpersonal and social interactions, and to build confidence needed to advance to the higher levels of ASL courses.

This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

This course covers the central ideas of computer science using visualization and application. Students will learn the ideas and practices of computational thinking with a focus on fostering student creativity. They will develop a range of skills by using computational tools to analyze and study data, work individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discuss the importance of problems and the impacts to their community, society and the world. This course is designed to be far more than a traditional introduction to programming. It is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the big, foundational ideas of computing so that all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. This is the first semester of a year-long course and continues with AP® Computer Science Principles B.

This course covers the central ideas of computer science using visualization and application. Students will learn the ideas and practices of computational thinking with a focus on fostering student creativity. They will develop a range of programming skills, work individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and explore a number of programming environments. This course is designed to be far more than a traditional introduction to programming. It is a rigorous, engaging, and approachable course that explores many of the big, foundational ideas of computing so that all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in. This is the second semester of a year-long course and continues the concepts and skills covered in AP Computer Science Principles (Sem 1).

AP Physics 1 (Sem 1) is an introductory college-level physics course designed to simulate the rigor and skills needed for a first year college course. The course is algebra based and the topics of study include Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, mechanical waves, sound, and simple circuits. This course also has a laboratory requirement which will be met with hands-on labs along with online simulations. The labs will be inquiry-based to provide students the opportunity to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills along with applying the science practices. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

AP Physics 2 (Sem 1) is an introductory college-level physics course designed to simulate the rigor and skills needed for a first year college course. The course is algebra based and the topics of study include fluids, thermodynamics, electrostatics, electric circuits, and magnetism. This course also has a laboratory requirement which will be met with hands-on labs along with online simulations. The labs will be inquiry-based to provide students the opportunity to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills along with applying the science practices. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet the expectations of the College Board. According to the College Board, “The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.” This course covers the following units: History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, State of Consciousness, Learning, and Cognition. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet the expectations of the College Board. According to the College Board, “The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.” This course covers the following units: Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Behavior, Treatment of Abnormal Behavior, and Social Psychology. Students will learn how to approach both the multiple-choice questions and the free-response questions on the AP Exam. In addition, students will engage in class discussions and apply concepts learned to aspects of the real world. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. AP Modern World History is a college-level survey course that covers the major global trends, events, changes, and systems from 1200 to the present day. This course consists of seven distinct units that unfold specific topics in specific regions and time within the scope of the following six themes identified by the College Board. The goal of this course is for students to understand the significant factors that have shaped our world today and why/how global societies developed in the manner that they did. Students will be assigned to read varied reading materials, including textbook chapters, and watch instructional videos, and have discussions with their classmates. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to write short and long argumentative essays, analyze sources, compare historical events, make historical connections, and provide historically valid evidence.

Astronomy provides a broad overview of all topics in astronomy for the beginner. The course provides a foundation to the science of astronomy including motions in the night sky and the tools of modern astronomy. It contains the most up-to-date science about our solar system, stars and galaxies. Astronomy also explores the exciting prospects for future discovery in astronomy including life in the universe and the mysteries that continue to perplex astronomers. The course provides an engaging combination of videos, interactive media, photo galleries and readings so that students can explore the content in a variety of ways.

Biology A introduces students to the scientific method and major concepts of biology from an historical and practical viewpoint. The three major themes of this course are the cell, the molecular basis of heredity, and taxonomy and speciation. Students who take this class will have a deeper appreciation for the complexities of living organisms. Life on this planet, unlike anywhere else in the observable universe, is complex and highly organized. Whether examining life on the molecular or the planetary level, it exhibits a highly organized structure that inspires awe by its genius and complexity. In the last 50 years, discoveries have launched new branches of biology that have transformed the daily routine, from conception to death. New challenges await, such as the current crisis in ecology, global warming, and the resurgence in viral disease. To make rational choices in the 21st century, the citizen must have a basic understanding of biological concepts and the reasoning behind them.

Biology B is a continuation of Biology A. The major concepts covered are population dynamics and evolution. Students explore population dynamics through the study of mutualism, predation, parasitism, and competition. The theory of evolution is presented, along with the many evidences and details that make evolution the backbone of modern biology. From biochemistry to evolution, biology fascinates people. Biochemists first astounded the world by showing that life obeys the same chemical principles as all creation, but that life engineers chemistry to its own needs. Decades later, Darwin shocked the world by suggesting that life evolves according to the conditions of the environment it inhabits. Evolution, often debated and derided, has survived to become a key concept of biology. This second semester of biology examines the wonder of life and its mechanisms.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit, such as Transformation of Language and Informed Decision Making.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence in British literature. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit, such as Technology: Potential for Enhancing Human Life and The DNA for Survival.

Sometimes choices between right and wrong are obvious. But what happens when you’re faced with a situation that’s not so clear-cut? In this course, students will learn to anticipate and address ethical dilemmas that come up in a business setting. They will examine how humans have understood ethics over the years and what matters most in the business world today. Students will investigate actual scenarios and apply all they’ve learned to addressing these complicated ethical dilemmas. By the end, students will have developed their ability to work through challenging situations using their own moral imagination. Students will also have a variety of role models, lessons learned from ethical scandals, and ethical skills to draw upon when they face these challenges in real life.

This course provides a basic overview of career planning concepts. It gives students the opportunity to learn about, explore and reflect on various career opportunities based on Michigan’s six Career Pathways.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. In this course, students will learn about the composition of matter, its chemical and physical properties, and how these change in chemical reactions. Other topics include measurement and calculations, the scientific method, chemical nomenclature, and energy changes that accompany physical and chemical changes. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Students will have hands-on opportunities to conduct investigations at home. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. It continues the study of chemical reactions with calculations in chemical reactions, rates of reactions, reactions equilibrium, and redox reactions. Other topics include phases of matter, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This one-semester course prepares students for informed and responsible participation as citizens in the American representative system. Students deepen their awareness of the values expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other foundational documents of the United States. Students learn the purposes and structures of government within the American federal system. Students gain a deeper understanding of the role of the United States in its relations with other nations. Students also learn how citizens exert influence on public affairs and decisions. By participating in this course, students are better prepared to exercise the rights and responsibilities of American citizenship.

Criminology isn’t about solving cases and catching perpetrators. Criminologists work to understand why crime happens in the first place. They also focus on how to prevent and address crime. As you go through this course, you’ll be given a series of challenging situations that need the mindset of a criminologist to navigate successfully. The course will encourage you to analyze a range of criminal acts, from shoplifting to hate crimes. By the end, you’ll have an opportunity to envision alternative strategies for dealing with crime in our society and in your own school environment in particular.

Learn how to communicate through graphics and digital photography. In this class, you will “focus” on the basics of camera operation, exposure, image control, picture composition, photo enhancement, and photo manipulation. This course discusses digital and traditional film photography, design, graphic arts, and electronic communication through discussions and mock-ups. You will complete photography projects which demonstrate techniques such as portraiture, composition, landscapes, architecture, wildlife, and nature. It is STRONGLY recommended that you use a digital camera for this course to complete all required assignments. If you choose to use a cell phone for this course, you will also need to access a photo editing application that permits users to apply settings that can generally be applied within menus typical of DSLR cameras. Note: This course does not focus on how to use specific photo editing software, but rather on the characteristics of various forms of photographic art and techniques used to achieve such artwork. Therefore, students should be prepared to use their camera and software editing tools or plan to learn and experiment with their use on their own while completing course activities.

This is the first session of a two-session course. Earth Science A is the study of the earth we live on, inside and out. Through various media, interactive web sites, video viewing and several hands-on lab activities, including the award-winning Smart Science labs, students will learn the content and be able to apply their knowledge to answer thought-provoking questions using scientific method and reasoning. The student will also learn how the content applies to them and how it affects their everyday lives. Students will also be doing a few hands-on experiments that will require minimum purchases and some adult supervision.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth’s composition, structure, processes and history; its atmosphere, freshwater and oceans; and its environment in space. Course topics include laying the groundwork; the movers and shakers; minerals and rocks; all the time in the world; and earth’s resources.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the ways that economics affects the lives of individuals and how individuals, through their economic choices, can shape their world. This one-semester course provides an overview of the basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, including: a) economic theory; b) supply, demand and price; c) economic systems; d) business cycles; e) investments; f) the role of government, g) international trade; and h) consumer choices. Students will also apply the principles of this course to issues related to personal finance.

Economics of Personal Finance examines micro-economic principles pertaining to personal finance and teaches students how to apply real-life mathematics concepts and processes to their personal finances through a personal economics perspective (i.e., a particular strand of Michigan social studies standards). For instance, students will learn how to manage their money.

EdReady English is designed to help students meet basic college entrance requirements. This program integrates and reinforces the standard developmental English curriculum — reading comprehension, writing, vocabulary building, and grammar skills — to fully prepare students for credit-bearing courses. EdReady English permits students to self-assess for mastery of grade-level knowledge and skills and readiness for their next level of study toward college English readiness. EdReady uses diagnostic testing to establish personalized study paths to fill in learning gaps and to reinforce understanding. Each EdReady English goal contains between 9-26 learning topics. As students demonstrate mastery of each skill and learning topic in their study path, they see their goal score increase as evidence of progress toward their target score of 100. View a two-minute overview of EdReady English from the NROC Project.

EdReady is part of the non-profit NROC Project.

EdReady Math permits students to self-assess for mastery of grade-level knowledge and skills and ensure their readiness for their next math course. EdReady uses diagnostic testing to establish personalized study paths in order to fill in learning gaps and to reinforce understanding.  Depending on the subject and grade level you select, you will be provided with one to six goal keys related to the concepts and skills aligned to the relevant content standards or assessment objectives. The online instructional model for each learning topic in EdReady Math follows a consistent structure of Warm Up, Presentation, Worked Examples, Topic Text, Practice, Review, and Test.  EdReady also utilizes a variety of topic-specific, media-rich resources, including an embedded glossary, NROC Developmental Math content, Khan Academy, and more. As students demonstrate mastery of each skill and learning topic in their study path, they see their goal score increase as evidence of progress toward their target score of 100.

EdReady is part of the non-profit NROC Project.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. Students will read engaging works of literature and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will complete two sets of units that focus on narrative writing and argumentative writing.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. In this course students will read engaging works and explore topics of interest as they develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will use essential questions to focus on a topic for each unit. The course is aligned to the Common Core Standards.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. As students progress through the course, they will explore two main themes, “Courage” and “Choice”, and address essential questions while reading a variety of works. Students will read novels, short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos and write for various purposes. Larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like symbolism, figurative language, theme, setting and more.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The two major themes for this semester are “Survival” and “Discovery.” As students progress through these themes, they will address several essential questions related to these themes while reading a variety of works. In addition to major works, students will read short stories and informational texts, engage in poetry analysis, view informational videos, and write for various purposes. Some of the larger writing assignments include a research project and a narrative essay. As a supplement to these writing assignments, students will partake in grammar challenges where they learn about grammar concepts and develop a mastery of their use. In addition to building their writing skills, students will learn several reading strategies such as how to use graphic organizers to extract important information and summarize to monitor comprehension. Furthermore, students will explore several rhetorical devices and strategies like characterization, allusion, word choice and diction, setting, and more.

Ever wonder what it takes to own your own business, be your own boss and write your own paycheck? Entrepreneurship helps students examine their readiness and passion for such an undertaking. Students will learn what entrepreneurship is all about, develop a business idea, conduct a feasibility analysis, identify their primary customer, learn about financing a business and write a business plan. They will also learn about how to manage their business, including the hiring process, operations, inventory controls and production management. The final step will be developing their strategic plan for the future to help bring their entrepreneurial dreams to reality.

This course is designed to guide students through the process of exploring and choosing potential career pathways. Students will engage in self-exploration activities such as skills and interests assessments and apply what they learn to the process of choosing a career. Course features include an exploration of post-secondary educational options and requirements, informational interview and job shadowing experiences, as well as problem solving and goal setting activities. This student-centered course focuses on helping students get to know themselves so they can find the future that’s right for them! Instead of a final exam, students will complete an end-of-course project. To complete this project students will use the assignments in each unit to help them begin to develop an Educational Development Plan (EDP). An Educational Development Plan is designed to help students identify their career and educational goals as they relate to academic requirements. An EDP is a way for students to document their progress toward career and educational goals. If students have already started an EDP at their schools, they can use this final project to update it with the most current information about their career and educational goals.

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will discover the various roles and responsibilities associated with a career in forensics. Students will learn basic crime scene analysis skills used by investigators in both the field and lab. In addition, students will be given an overview of the various forms of evidence left by criminals at the scene of the crime as well as the opportunity to apply this knowledge to hypothetical situations. Special focus will be placed on real world application of the knowledge presented to allow students a chance to experience some of what forensic scientists experience on a daily basis. Please note: In some lessons, students will be asked to use household items to recreate the content in the lesson. In such cases, multiple options will be available in an attempt to accommodate the diverse situations of our students. Some examples of materials that may be needed could include but are not limited to, modeling clay, tape, hand tools, etc. Additionally, since this is an online course, students may be asked to provide documentation of their work to ensure authenticity. Typically, this is accomplished by having students provide a digital image of their work. Therefore, students will need to have access to a camera or some form of image capturing device (cell phone, webcam, etc.). Graphic content notification: Due to the nature of this course, some content may be disturbing to some students. Images of dead and decaying bodies, as well as content that involves murder cases, drug overdoses, and sexual assault, will be addressed.

In French 1A, students will begin their language-learning journey by gaining the skills needed to talk about themselves and the world around them. The theme for the course is Ma vie (My Life). Students will learn to introduce themselves, share some basic personal information, talk about their family and friends, discuss what they like to do for fun, and describe their daily routine at home and school. Throughout the course, students will follow along on the fictional journey of three students learning French, seeing them in school, at home, and in other parts of their daily lives. French 1A is the first semester of a two-semester course. The class takes a proficiency-based approach, which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is placed on meaningful language use, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities.

In French 1B, students will continue their language learning journey by exploring the French-speaking world. Students will use the language to learn about the cultural practices and products of France while independently conducting research on another French-speaking location of their choice. Throughout the course, students will follow the fictional journey of three students and their teacher, as they themselves explore and share they’ve learned about French-speaking cultures. French 1B is the second semester of a two-semester course. The class takes a proficiency-based approach which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is placed on meaningful language use, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities.

French 2A is the first semester of a two-semester course, which builds on the foundation of language skills acquired in French 1A and 1B. The class takes a proficiency-based approach which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is placed on meaningful language use, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities.

French 2B is the second semester of a two-semester course, which builds on the foundation of language skills acquired in French 1A – 2A. The class takes a proficiency-based approach which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is placed on meaningful language use, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities.

This course addresses Common Core standards and is designed to cover Semester 1 of High School Geometry for students following the Traditional Pathway of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II in that order. The course is generally taken during the second year of high school. Of the six Common Core units for High School Geometry, this course will cover Common Core Unit 1: Congruence, Proof, and Constructions and from Unit 2: Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry will cover Similarity and Proof.

This course addresses Common Core standards and is designed to cover Semester 2 of High School Geometry for students following the Traditional Pathway of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II in that order. The course is generally taken during the second year of high school. Of the six Common Core units for High School Geometry, this course will cover Common Core Unit 3: Extending to Three Dimensions, Unit 4: Connecting Algebra and Geometry through Coordinates, and Unit 5: Circles With and Without Coordinates. Application of geometric concepts in modeling situations will be presented throughout the course.

German 1A is the first semester of a two-semester course. In German 1A, students will begin their language-learning journey by gaining the skills needed to talk about themselves and their immediate environment. Students will learn to introduce themselves, share some basic personal information, talk about their family and friends, discuss what they like to do for fun, and describe their daily routine at home and school. The class takes a proficiency-based approach, which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is put on German-speaking cultures around the world, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities. Throughout the 4 Modules, each containing 3 units, students’ language learning is guided by Can Do statements which focus on specific language abilities, such as “I can greet others and introduce myself.”

German 1B is the second semester of a two-semester course. In German 1B, students will continue their language-learning journey by gaining the skills needed to talk about themselves, their immediate environment, and German-speaking communities. Students will learn to share some basic personal information about topics including healthy eating habits, family traditions, and pop culture preferences. In addition, students will gather information about a German-speaking community and use this information for a presentation. To prepare for this students will gain the skills necessary to discuss culture, geography, and governments. The class takes a proficiency-based approach, which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is put on German-speaking cultures around the world, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities. Throughout the 4 Modules, each containing 3 units, students’ language learning is guided by Can Do statements which focus on specific language abilities, such as “I can greet others and introduce myself.”

German 2A is the first semester of a two-semester course, which builds on the foundation of language skills acquired in German 1A and 1B. The class takes a proficiency-based approach which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners. A heavy focus is placed on meaningful language use, with grammar being learned implicitly through input and meaning-based activities.

German 2B is the second semester of a two-semester course. In German 2B, students will continue their language-learning journey by gaining the skills needed to talk about themselves, their immediate environment, and German-speaking communities. Students will learn to share some basic personal information about topics including their communities, culture, spending habits, and future career plans. This course culminates with students presenting information about themselves. To prepare for this, students will write short texts about themselves and work toward their final presentation throughout the course. The class takes a proficiency-based approach, which is informed by current language acquisition research and the ACTFL performance descriptors for novice language learners.

In this course, students will learn to obtain, interpret, and apply health information and services in ways that protect and promote personal, family, and community health. Topics include nutrition and physical activity; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; safety; social and emotional health; personal health and wellness; HIV and other STIs prevention; and sexuality education.

This course is designed with a focus on abstinence only (no contraceptives). In this course, students will learn to obtain, interpret, and apply health information and services in ways that protect and promote personal, family, and community health. Topics include nutrition and physical activity; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; safety; social and emotional health; personal health and wellness; HIV and other STIs prevention; and sexuality education. Health Education (Abstinence Only) is designed with a focus on abstinence only (not contraceptives) as a method of birth control.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence and focuses on the most widely used Japanese syllabic writing system (Hiragana) and greetings and phrases used in everyday communication and contemporary Japanese cultures. Lessons are built upon familiar topics such as self, family, school, and friends to provide meaningful contexts to develop everyday conversation skills. Each lesson is designed to help students learn Hiragana gradually through decoding words and reading to speak conversational expressions. The course includes audio and video learning objects to demonstrate native Japanese speaker’s pronunciation, which supports students in building their interpersonal and interpretive fluency in Japanese. This course targets the Novice Level of MI World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. While it continues focusing on practical everyday communication skills and contemporary Japanese cultures, the course introduces the second widely used Japanese syllabic writing system, katakana. Lessons are built upon familiar topics such as self, family, school, and friends to provide meaningful contexts to develop everyday conversation skills. Each lesson is designed to help students learn katakana gradually as students work to master the first syllabic system hiragana through decoding words and reading to speak conversational expressions. The course includes audio and video learning objects to demonstrate native Japanese speaker’s pronunciation, which supports students in building their interpersonal and interpretive fluency in Japanese. It is also designed for students to experience and appreciate the third writing system, kanji. This course targets the Novice Level of the Michigan World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence of the second year Japanese. Lessons focus on language skills in everyday social interactions such as shopping, ordering food, and asking about the weather to communicate one’s need. Lessons also focus on contemporary Japanese cultures and practices to support culturally relevant communications. The introduction to the semantic writing system, Kanji, widely known as “Chinese Characters,” begins in this course. All course materials use Hiragana and Katakana without the Romaji guides. Therefore students are encouraged to shift away from the Romaji use. All lessons are equipped with audio and video learning objects to demonstrate native Japanese speaker’s pronunciation, which supports interpersonal and interpretive fluency in Japanese. This course targets the Novice Level of MI World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence of the second year Japanese. Lessons focus on language skills in everyday social interactions such as talking about past experiences, getting around the town, and writing emails to communicate one’s need. Lessons also focus on contemporary Japanese cultures and practices to support culturally relevant communications. The introduction to the semantic writing system, Kanji, widely known as “Chinese Characters,” continues in this course. All course materials use Hiragana and Katakana without the Romaji guides. Therefore students are encouraged to shift away from the Romaji use. All lessons are equipped with audio and video learning objects to demonstrate native Japanese speaker’s pronunciation, which supports interpersonal and interpretive fluency in Japanese. This course targets the Novice Level of MI World Language Standards and Benchmarks.

Thomas Jefferson once said, “…were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” The Founding Fathers believed strongly in a free press, which is why they included it prominently in the First Amendment of the Constitution. This course will not only explore the historical role of journalism in the development of our country, but also how journalists must ethically approach their duties in order to maintain the public trust. You will also learn the basic principles of how to report, interview, and write like a journalist by analyzing and covering news, feature, and sports stories. You will also examine how social media has changed the options available for reporters covering the news.

This applied math skills course is designed to introduce students to the basic math skills required for employment in Michigan’s 6 Career Pathways. Students will refresh their basic math skills, such as quantity, money, time, measurement, proportions & percentages, and averages, and apply these skills to solve real-life, mathematical word problems. In addition, students will explore sample careers in each of the six Michigan Career Pathways and complete scenario-based, workplace problems. Students will also research required workplace math skills for careers they are interested in and present their findings to their classmates.

In this course, students will learn about the mathematics found in baseball using Google Sheets as well as other tools and software. Topics will include a study in statistics, analyzing measures of central tendency as well as two-way frequencies tables. Students will work as a scout, analyzing rates and speeds as found in the sport and as general managers, analyzing trends and making math-based decisions. Students will also work as team managers, looking at probabilities of independent events and trends in data. Finally, students will research the history of baseball, and complete a culminating final project.

In this course students will “travel back in time” to learn some musical basics and history. In the first three units, students will learn about basics of musical ideas, notation, and instruments. In the remaining 5 units, students will learn about important musical ideas and people from the Ancient Times to the 20th Century. Students will be guided through a series of activities, lessons, and assessments that teach them to identify and think about music in a way they may not have previously thought to do.

This course provides an introduction to Native American history in North America and the Caribbean. Students will consider the varied societies Native peoples built before Europeans arrived and the challenges that the arrival of Europeans posed to them. Students will especially focus on the relationship between the United States and Native Americans, particularly as it has been understood by Native Americans themselves in their struggles for land, sovereignty, and identity.

This course is designed to assist students in developing motor skills, knowledge, and behaviors for healthy active living, physical fitness, sportsmanship, self-efficacy, and emotional intelligence. Topics include cardiovascular, muscular, nutritional, mental, and emotional fitness. In addition, students will assess their own levels of fitness, set fitness goals, and learn strategies for meeting those goals. Throughout the course, students will keep a fitness journal to track their progress toward their goals.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The science of physics involves the discovery of patterns and relationships in natural phenomena. As students progress through this interactive course, they will be introduced to familiar situations from a new perspective. They will learn to explain, according to the laws of physics, events that occur in the world around them. Through text, graphics, interactive simulations, Smart Science Labs, Gizmos and many instructional videos they will investigate straight-line motion, motion in two dimensions, rotational motion, energy, relativity, properties of matter, change of state, and heat and temperature.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Students will continue their study of physics by using text, graphics, interactive simulations, Gizmos, and instructional videos to investigate waves, sound, light, electricity, circuits, nuclear, and modern physics.

This introduction to Psychology course aims to answer the question: Why do people act the way they do? In studying human and animal behavior, students will examine topics such as life span development, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, personality theories, biological and environmental influences on behavior, societal influences, stress and its effects, psychological disorders and treatment, and others. This course is designed to introduce students to the science that is psychology and help students better understand themselves and those around them.

This course provides an overview of sociological theories, methods, and concepts such as culture and socialization, introducing the student to the ways that their lives are affected by the people and social institutions around them.

This is the second course in a 2-course series. While Sociology provided an overview of many sociological concepts, Sociology II provides students with a more in-depth look at sociological approaches and how they are applied to social problems. The majority of the units will highlight inequality as a way to focus the student’s attention on a particular issue and its potential solutions.

Strategies for Online Success (SOS) is an orientation to learning online geared towards preparing students for the transition from taking courses in-person to taking them online. It consists of three modules:

  1. Online Learning Basics
  2. Skills for Online Learning
  3. Online Learning Technology

The modules include interactive components, such as videos, self-checks, and resources for students to download. Some of the key learning outcomes include:

  • Recognize the importance of goal setting and the elements of SMART goals.
  • Identify when to ask for help and who to contact.
  • Identify strategies for employing netiquette and respectful communication in an online course.
  • Identify strategies for managing time, managing distractions, and combating procrastination.
  • Identify ways in which you can organize your online and physical learning environments.
  • Recognize basic Internet search techniques and operators.
  • Recognize strategies for setting up and managing digital files.

This course is designed to facilitate the strengthening of study skills and strategies to increase students’ performance and success in an academic setting. Students will learn how to use their learning styles to tailor approaches to learning, process information more efficiently, manage time effectively, set clear and attainable goals, increase concentration, reduce stress and procrastination, read critically, take notes effectively, improve listening skills, and prepare for tests with a variety of question formats.

This is the first course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis.. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

This is the second course of a two-course sequence. The purpose of U.S. history instruction is to foster civic-mindedness, global awareness, and social responsibility. Historical knowledge can empower the development of American citizenship values, active participation, and informed decision-making based on critical inquiry and analysis. Assignments include short-form free response essays, primary document analysis, and investigative projects. Students will develop social studies-specific skills, including chronological reasoning, historical interpretation of perspective, inquiry, causal thinking, and argumentation.

Building on the educational outcomes of Visual Arts in elementary and middle school education, high school art prepares students for personal development in the arts, the construction of a body of work that may be instrumental in admission to higher education and professional development. The Visual Arts/Comprehensive I course introduces art history, art criticism, aesthetic judgment and studio production. Emphasizes the ability to understand and use elements and principles of design through a variety of media, processes and visual resources. Explores master artworks for historical and cultural significance.

This course is the first course of a two-course sequence offering a comparative study of how and why economic, social, political and intellectual factors shaped and defined the history of Western and non-Western civilizations in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras. This course also incorporates a geographical perspective to help students visualize, comprehend, and ask questions about why the human and physical systems occur in particular patterns and combinations, where they are on Earth’s surface, why they are there, and the consequences for people and the environment. This course has been designed to align with the principles of the State of Michigan’s High School Social Studies Content Standards and Expectations.

This course is the second course of a two-course sequence offering a comparative study of how and why selected economic, social, political, and intellectual revolutions of the modern world have transformed and shaped contemporary European and non-Western cultures. This course also incorporates a geographical perspective to help students visualize, comprehend, and ask questions about why the human and physical systems occur in particular patterns and combinations, where they are on Earth’s surface, why they are there, and the consequences for people and the environment. This course has been designed to align with the principles of the State of Michigan’s High School Social Studies Content Standards and Expectations and the Common Core State Standards.

What is culture and how has it been conveyed through literature? This 18-week course will take students on a journey of self-discovery and cultural awareness by reading literature that tells the stories from various perspectives around the world. Students will strive to recognize the similarities and differences in literature and culture by looking at certain time periods, geographical areas, and themes. The course will involve reading, writing, discussion, critical thinking, and self-discovery as students explore the world through words.

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