Science

The free access to course content will end after June 30, 2021, with the exception of EdReady Math and EdReady English, which ends after July 31, 2020.

This course presents a fascinating, in-depth exploration of the structure and function of the human body. The course will use a systems approach and will emphasize how organs and body systems work together to carry on complex processes. Concepts and principles will be related to familiar health issues, problems and experiences we face as humans. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the human body and how its parts work together to maintain the delicate equilibrium of life.

AP Physics 1 (Sem 1) is an introductory college-level physics course designed to simulate the rigor and skills needed for a first year college course. The course is algebra based and the topics of study include Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, mechanical waves, sound, and simple circuits. This course also has a laboratory requirement which will be met with hands-on labs along with online simulations. The labs will be inquiry-based to provide students the opportunity to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills along with applying the science practices. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

AP Physics 2 (Sem 1) is an introductory college-level physics course designed to simulate the rigor and skills needed for a first year college course. The course is algebra based and the topics of study include fluids, thermodynamics, electrostatics, electric circuits, and magnetism. This course also has a laboratory requirement which will be met with hands-on labs along with online simulations. The labs will be inquiry-based to provide students the opportunity to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills along with applying the science practices. This course does not include the AP exam; students can contact their school’s AP coordinator or guidance counselor to sign up for the exam. In order to maintain the integrity of AP standards, all AP course midterm and final exams must be proctored.

Astronomy provides a broad overview of all topics in astronomy for the beginner. The course provides a foundation to the science of astronomy including motions in the night sky and the tools of modern astronomy. It contains the most up-to-date science about our solar system, stars and galaxies. Astronomy also explores the exciting prospects for future discovery in astronomy including life in the universe and the mysteries that continue to perplex astronomers. The course provides an engaging combination of videos, interactive media, photo galleries and readings so that students can explore the content in a variety of ways.

Biology A introduces students to the scientific method and major concepts of biology from an historical and practical viewpoint. The three major themes of this course are the cell, the molecular basis of heredity, and taxonomy and speciation. Students who take this class will have a deeper appreciation for the complexities of living organisms. Life on this planet, unlike anywhere else in the observable universe, is complex and highly organized. Whether examining life on the molecular or the planetary level, it exhibits a highly organized structure that inspires awe by its genius and complexity. In the last 50 years, discoveries have launched new branches of biology that have transformed the daily routine, from conception to death. New challenges await, such as the current crisis in ecology, global warming, and the resurgence in viral disease. To make rational choices in the 21st century, the citizen must have a basic understanding of biological concepts and the reasoning behind them.

Biology B is a continuation of Biology A. The major concepts covered are population dynamics and evolution. Students explore population dynamics through the study of mutualism, predation, parasitism, and competition. The theory of evolution is presented, along with the many evidences and details that make evolution the backbone of modern biology. From biochemistry to evolution, biology fascinates people. Biochemists first astounded the world by showing that life obeys the same chemical principles as all creation, but that life engineers chemistry to its own needs. Decades later, Darwin shocked the world by suggesting that life evolves according to the conditions of the environment it inhabits. Evolution, often debated and derided, has survived to become a key concept of biology. This second semester of biology examines the wonder of life and its mechanisms.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. In this course, students will learn about the composition of matter, its chemical and physical properties, and how these change in chemical reactions. Other topics include measurement and calculations, the scientific method, chemical nomenclature, and energy changes that accompany physical and chemical changes. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Students will have hands-on opportunities to conduct investigations at home. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course is designed to meet both the Michigan Content Standards for Chemistry (Michigan Merit Curriculum) and the literacy standards of Common Core State Standards for Science and Technical Subjects. It continues the study of chemical reactions with calculations in chemical reactions, rates of reactions, reactions equilibrium, and redox reactions. Other topics include phases of matter, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Each lesson includes a variety of sources of information, including text, videos, interactive simulations and self-check exercises. Practice exercises are included as well as graded assignments.

This is the first session of a two-session course. Earth Science A is the study of the earth we live on, inside and out. Through various media, interactive web sites, video viewing and several hands-on lab activities, including the award-winning Smart Science labs, students will learn the content and be able to apply their knowledge to answer thought-provoking questions using scientific method and reasoning. The student will also learn how the content applies to them and how it affects their everyday lives. Students will also be doing a few hands-on experiments that will require minimum purchases and some adult supervision.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth’s composition, structure, processes and history; its atmosphere, freshwater and oceans; and its environment in space. Course topics include laying the groundwork; the movers and shakers; minerals and rocks; all the time in the world; and earth’s resources.

This course provides students with a basic introduction to the field of forensic science. Students will discover the various roles and responsibilities associated with a career in forensics. Students will learn basic crime scene analysis skills used by investigators in both the field and lab. In addition, students will be given an overview of the various forms of evidence left by criminals at the scene of the crime as well as the opportunity to apply this knowledge to hypothetical situations. Special focus will be placed on real world application of the knowledge presented to allow students a chance to experience some of what forensic scientists experience on a daily basis. Please note: In some lessons, students will be asked to use household items to recreate the content in the lesson. In such cases, multiple options will be available in an attempt to accommodate the diverse situations of our students. Some examples of materials that may be needed could include but are not limited to, modeling clay, tape, hand tools, etc. Additionally, since this is an online course, students may be asked to provide documentation of their work to ensure authenticity. Typically, this is accomplished by having students provide a digital image of their work. Therefore, students will need to have access to a camera or some form of image capturing device (cell phone, webcam, etc.). Graphic content notification: Due to the nature of this course, some content may be disturbing to some students. Images of dead and decaying bodies, as well as content that involves murder cases, drug overdoses, and sexual assault, will be addressed.

This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The science of physics involves the discovery of patterns and relationships in natural phenomena. As students progress through this interactive course, they will be introduced to familiar situations from a new perspective. They will learn to explain, according to the laws of physics, events that occur in the world around them. Through text, graphics, interactive simulations, Smart Science Labs, Gizmos and many instructional videos they will investigate straight-line motion, motion in two dimensions, rotational motion, energy, relativity, properties of matter, change of state, and heat and temperature.

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Students will continue their study of physics by using text, graphics, interactive simulations, Gizmos, and instructional videos to investigate waves, sound, light, electricity, circuits, nuclear, and modern physics.

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